Vegetable Gardening For Beginners – Planting a Beautiful Vegetable Garden at Home

Are you looking to plant your very own vegetable garden but you're not sure how to get started? Planting a healthy vegetable garden provides so many benefits including an abundance of healthy organic food and saving thousands on your grocery bills. I don't know about you but I still remember the days when a tomato from the supermarket tasted like a tomato, not anymore unfortunately. Let's look at some vegetable gardening for beginners tips to help get you started today.

Vegetable Gardening For Beginners – Tips
Preparation is the key to growing a beautiful and healthy vegetable garden. Planning is critical for setting up a vegetable garden that you can harvest every daily. Vegetable gardening for beginners does not have to be difficult with the correct planning.

First you must decide on your plot, the area for your garden. The ideal spot is somewhere that receives plenty of morning sun and protection from the elements such as wind. Although you maybe limited with the space you have available don't be discouraged as you will be shocked at how much you can grow by maximizing the space you have. Ensure there is sufficient drainage for water run off.

Importance Of Soil Quality
One of the most common vegetable gardening for beginners tips you will hear is never underestimate soil quality. Soil is the life line of a garden do not underestimate it's importance. You must ensure that your soil preparations include checking the soil and preparing it by testing its pH levels. The ideal pH level for your soil is 6.5, if you do not have a test kit you can go to your local garden outlet and let them test it for you.

Don't stress if your levels are out of whack for the moment, you can purchase garden lime that will improve the pH levels of your soil. In a nutshell your pH levels will determine how much nutrients your vegetables will be able to receive.

Preparing Your Plot
Dig your plot and turn your soil over, ensure you dig into a depth of about 12 "(30cm) and remove any weeds you find by hand. Avoid using weed killers and they can effect your soil structure and levels. Once your pH levels are in healthy range, wait 4-5 weeks before you begin planting.

The vegetables that you grow will dependent on where you live. Speak to your gardening outlet that will buy seedlings from for the most suitable vegetables.
Ask about purchasing some organic fertilizer which will be the life blood of your garden. Organic fertilizers such as animal manure, blood and bones as well as compost are terrific choices for providing essential nutrients and moisture.

Growing Vegetables Year Round
The key to planting a successful garden is to have vegetables that you can harvest year round. By doing this you can rotate different vegetables to help ensure the health of your gardening by limiting pests and diseases. One of the most common vegetable gardening for beginners mistakes is …

Planting A Fall Vegetable Garden

If you're like most gardeners, you probably consider August to be the tail end of the growing season. The truth of the matter is that it's a great time to start your fall garden.

A fall garden can produce excellent vegetables and extend your crops long after your spring planted garden is finished. The vegetables you harvest from the fall garden are often sweeter and milder than those grown over the summer.

What type of vegetables you plant in your fall garden will depend on the space you have, as well as the types of vegetables you like. Be sure that you plant vegetables with the shortest growing season, this will increase the chances they will be full grown and harvested before the hard frost sets in. Starting your seeds indoors the first week of July will also give you a good head start.

Most seed packages will be labeled "early season", or you can find the seeds that are labeled with the fewest days to harvest. Since seeds are not usually kept in stock towards the end of summer, you will probably need to purchase seeds for your fall garden in the spring. You can also find them easily online at places Gurneys.com.

Even vegetables that like the heat of summer, like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and peppers, will produce nicely until harder frosts hit, which can be fairly late in the year in certain areas.

There are certain vegetable plants that normally stop producing towards the end of summer. These include snap-beans, summer squash, and cucumbers. Even these, if planted in the middle of summer, can produce nicely until the first frosts arrive. Many hardy vegetables will grow with temperatures as low as 20 degrees.

If you have root plants such as beets, carrots or radishes, that have the tops killed by a freeze, you can save them by applying a heavy layer of mulch.

For fall gardening you need to know approximately when the first hard frost normally hits your particular area. The Farmer's Almanac is a great resource for this type of information. It will give you specific dates and is fairly accurate most of the time. You also need to know approximately how long your plants will take to mature. As I said, this is available by reading the individual seed packets.

To prepare the soil for your fall garden, the first thing you will need to do is clear out leftover summer crops and weeds. If you leave the leftover vines and plant debris from your summer crops, bacteria and diseases can develop from these leftover remnants. If your spring plants were not fertilized heavily, you may want to spread a few inches of compost over the garden next.

Once that is done you will need to till the soil and wet it down. Now simply wait 24 hours and your ready to plant.

All too often gardeners will shy away from planting a fall garden, to avoid dealing with frosts. I can tell you …

How to Start a Vegetable Garden From Scratch!

1. Plot out your garden area. Decide on what you want to plant and how much room you will need to grow those plants. Also, the amount of sunlight is very important in picking out the proper placement of your garden. You will want an area that gets direct sunlight most for the day. Something else to take into account is the drainage of the land. You will not want your garden in a depressed area of ‚Äč‚Äčland because water will tend to flood those areas and won't drain properly. I prefer using a slightly sloped piece of land or a flat piece of land that retains and drains water properly. Once you have chosen the location and size of you garden you will want to mark the boundaries of the garden with stakes or flags.

2. Next is the part of the job that will likely take the most time, preparing the soil. Preparing the soil means two things to me:

A. Cutting and removing the sod. You have several options when deciding how you want to get rid of the grass and get down to the soil. If you have a very large garden you may want to hire somebody or rent the equipment (bobcat) to tear up the grass. If you own a rototiller (you can rent one), you can use this to remove the sod. There are two main types of tillers, front tine or rear tine. Rear tine tillers have the blades in the back of the machine and typically are a bit easier to use due to the fact that you (as the operator) get more weight / leverage over top the blades. Front tine tillers have the blades in the front and can be a bit harder to use on hard sod or compacted soil since there is not as much weight / leverage over top the blades to make them bite in as well as a rear tine tiller. If you have a very small garden area then you may also choose to use a shovel to tear up the sod. Personally, my brother and I used a tiller to tear up a rather large patch of land for our garden. We would run the tiller over the grass to break it up then rake the grass clumps into one large pile in the corner of our garden, which eventually decomposed to plain dirt. We had to run the tiller over the garden area several times and rake clumps of grass each time before we had a workable dirt area. This can be a back breaking task so make sure to take your time and rest sometimes.

B. Getting the soil ready to plant in. Plants will produce their best when they have a healthy, somewhat loose, soil to grow in. This means that you want a nutrient rich soil that retains just the right amount of moisture. You can take soil samples into many garden centers to get a test done. …

Create A Synergistic Vegetable Garden In 10 Easy Steps

Vegetable gardening shouldn’t be hard work. Look at all of the abundance that mother nature grows, do you see her out digging, weeding, pruning, fertilizing? No, of course not! Natural systems do all of the work and synergistic vegetable gardening puts those systems to work in your garden, producing a bountiful harvest the natural way.

So how do you get started building a synergistic vegetable garden?

#1. Build raised beds. You don’t need to build wooden frameworks and fill them with soil. Just create long mounds of soil about 4 feet wide and 10 – 30 inches high. Flatten the top of the mound.

#2. Cover the mound with mulch. This can be a mixture of materials – straw, shredded cardboard, sheeps wool, leaves, sawdust, shredded branches, newspaper etc.

#3. A few days before you are ready to start planting open the mulch on top of the bed to allow the soil to warm up.

#4. Plant seedlings in the bed and close the mulch back up around the plants. Seeds are planted in the same way.

#5. Place beneficial plants – called companion plants – through out your garden. You can plant them into the sides of the beds. Marigolds, will for example protect your plants from nematodes.

#6. Do not use compost on your garden or add fertilizer. It is not necessary and causes harm to the soil.

#7. When it is time to harvest from your garden, cut plants off just above the soil and leave the roots in place. All of the vegetation that is not used should be placed on top of the mulch right where that plant was growing.

#8. Never walk on your beds, till them or dig them.

#9. Weeding is still necessary at first, but due to the mulch the amount of weeds will be greatly reduced. Over time as the mulch builds up, less weed seeds will find there way into the soil.

#10. Water the beds during dry spells. The mulch prevents a hard surface developing on your soil which leads to water run off. The mulch also reduces evaporation. A hummus rich soil holds onto water, making it available to the plants for longer.

So there you have the basics in a nutshell. The idea of synergistic gardening is to mimic a system which builds the soil naturally. It is the bacteria and earthworms in our soil that create this fertility through their life processes. We do not need to interfere with a process that nature has perfected. When we do, we just create more work for ourselves along with reduced soil fertility.

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